Five Freedoms of Animal Welfare :

  • Freedom From Hunger and Thirst
  • Free From Thermal and Physical Discomfort
  • Free From Injury, Illness and Pain
  • Freedom to Express Most Normal Behavior Patterns
  • Free from Fear and Troubles

 

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Case Study : Rectal Prolapse in Cats

Before talking further about the case study of rectal prolapse in cats. This time, allow me to share a little story about my cat “Jat”. Jat is a cat that rescued by us who had a rectal prolapse that required surgery.

One year ago me and Rini were enjoying a meal under a tree near the beach. At that moment Rini heard the sound of a cat meowing. It turned out that the cat was in the tree. Usually when someone eats a cat will approach, but not with Jat. Suspicious of his behavior, Rini approached the tree and saw it from below.

We were shocked when we found out that the cat’s rectum came out and was red. At that time we were still in the first semester of veterinary studies, so we didn’t really understand what happened to the cat. Then I climbed a tree and took the cat.

After that we took the cat home. Starting from a sense of caring, at that time Rini, Hilal, and Jatmiko decided to go to the Animal Hospital in Banyuwangi, East Java, Indonesia. When at the animal hospital, the vet said that Jat had rectal prolapse in cats.

Rectal prolapse is a condition where one or more layers of the rectum pass through the anal orifice. In general, rectal prolapse occurs in young and old animals due to constipation, endoparasites, diarrhea, heredity, loss of anal sphincter power, and loosening of the rectal mucous membrane (Muhadjir et al, 2019).

After that Jat get some handling in the form of :

  • Physical examination such as checking body temperature and weighing.
  • Handling the cat in a prone position or ventral recumbency. The back is higher than the front.
  • The perianal area was cleaned using a physiological NaCl solution.
  • Giving antibiotics to avoid bacterial infection.
  • Reposition aseptically with the aid of a lubricant.
  • Administration of local anesthesia.
  • Purse String sewing using non-absorbable threads.

Alhamdulillah at that time the cost of the Jat cat after handling was paid by Jatmiko. Thank you, Jatmiko. After that, the purse string stitches came off because the anus was already blue and easily torn. Jat had rectal prolapse again.

Also read article about : “Tips to Keep Your Cat Healthy”

Seeing Jat’s condition, we consulted a veterinarian at the animal hospital for further treatment. Due to limited funds, we made an open donation for the Jat cat. Alhamdulillah, in a few days the donations have been collected for pay the operation costs. May the donor always be given the blessing and health amen.

After the operation funds were collected, Jat’s cat was referred for surgery in the form of Colopexy.

Colopexy is an operative procedure or surgery designed to make the serous attachment of the ventral colon to the abdominal wall to prevent colon movement (Stephen, 1997). Colopexy is useful to prevent the cat from experiencing rectal prolapse again. Rectal prolapse is a common disease in dogs and cats, and colopexy is an efficient method of treating it (Zhang, 2013).

Colopexy Process of Rectal Prolapse in Cats

Here is a series of actions carried out in the Colopexy process of rectal prolapse in cats :

  • Physical examination such as temperature and weight measurement.
  • Fasting was carried out for approximately eight hours.
  • A physical examination was carried out again.
  • Anesthesia.
  • Colopexy Action.
  • Postoperative care.
  • After the operation, the Jat cat did not experience rectal prolapse anymore.

Thank you for reading the article on Case Study : Rectal Prolapse in Cats. Hopefully this article is useful for you.

Bibliography :

  • Muhadjir, I. M., Wandia, I. N., & Wardhita, A. A. G. J. 2019. Case Report: Rectal Prolapse in Peaknose Persian Cat.
  • Stephen R. Hance, 1997. Colopexy, Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice. Volume 13, Issue 2, Pages 351-358. ISSN 0749-0739.
  • Zhang, Shi-Xia, et al. 2013. Laparoscopic colopexy in dogs. Journal of Veterinary Medical Science. 12-0538.
Gigih Fikrillah S
Gigih Fikrillah S

Hi ! I am a veterinary student at Universitas Airlangga. I hope that what I wrote can help you to change the world. Laatahzan

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